A conversation about connoisseurship, quality and sustainability of furniture, art
and objects from the modern era

Recent Posts

Rowland's Ft Greene Community

Vintage Wallpaper Art

Susan Rowland by Appointment

Isamu Noguchi at BBG

Kamilla Talbot: New Works

Chinoiserie Mid-Century Style

Milo Baughman Before + After

Meet Mr. Wormley

townhouse.bz Presents Faux Real

Kipfmueller in Elle Decor

Nelson Sculptures & Prints

Kamilla Talbot: Getting Outside

Joan of Art

To the Pinkneys: A Big Thank You!

Black Tie Halloween?

Problem Solving with Townhouse

Neutra Speaks, Nelson Replies

Falling in Love with Faux Bois

Rowland: Uncontained Forces

Sneak Peek: Rowland Show

Vintage Woodson Wallpapers

Kipfmueller: Process Revealed

Hefty 2-Ply Travels

Oscar Niemeyer, Curvy Modernist

Portrait of Wonder Bread

Peter Shelton, RIP

Take Note: Wondrous Florals

Jud Nelson: Marble Hyperrealism

Faux Forever

After 9/11

Before 9/11

Kool Stools

Salve! Aliquisne domum est?

When is an original not?

Framing Bambi

Welcome to the Knolls

Karl Kipfmueller: Art

Susan Rowland: Art

Kamilla Talbot: Art

Reasons to Love Horsehair

Separated @ birth?

Q&A:I love the bronze table...

A Tonic for the Election

townhouse.bz in the NY Times!

Those legs, I know those legs!

What is Parchment?

Long look Marion, loonger...

What is Shagreen?



Blog Resources

All the Best

An Aesthete's Lament

Architect Design

Habitually Chic

Hollister Hovey

Scala Regalia

House of Beauty and Culture

The Peak of Chic

Archive for the 'Faux Bois' Category


through the holidays
@ Guild Greene Gallery
281 Greene Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11238
718 398 6792

Holiday Hours: 12/22, 23 & 24 noon to 6pm; or by appointment.

Barware, jewelry, objects, handmade toys and ornaments, newly restored mid-century modern furniture.


Featuring a pair of Verner Panton cone chairs with orange mohair seats.


A Corbu chaise with a chrome tri-leg glass top coffee table, Alvar Aalto dishes, a Bruce Fox tri-leg aluminum bowl, a Kay Bogeson Penguin.


A Milo Baughman swivel chair, a modern French daybed, a Bernhard Rohm acid etched coffee table.

A Salon Exhibition Art, Objects and Furniture Exploring the Realm of Mid-Century Modernism

Featuring the townhouse.bz collection including Jud Nelson, Kamilla Talbot Piaget Studios, Kathy Urbina, Le Corbusier, Knoll, Milo Baughman, Pierre Jeanneret, Charles and Ray Eames, George Nelson, Aldo Tura, Fornascetti, Edward Wormley.

Opening Saturday, July 26th, 2014
From 6 to 9pm
Showing through September 6th, 2014
Thu & Sun 12 to 6pm
Fri & Sat 12 to 7:30pm
or by appointment

@ Guild Greene Gallery
281 Greene Avenue
Clinton Hill, Brooklyn 11238
718 398 6792

Visit Faux Real and explore historic Clinton Hill. Guild Greene’s building is the original 1890s headquarters and laboratory for Bristol Myers. Fine dining nearby includes Speedy Romeo, Marietta, Locando Vini & Olli and Aita.

Shown above: Holos/Series 23, No.1 (Wood Match) Roman Travertine & Red Slate; Jud Nelson, 1994

Contact Us for more information.

Congratulations to friend and colleague, Karl Kipfmueller, on the feature of his beautiful home in the July/August 2014 issue of Elle Decor.

In addition to the incredible photos of Kipfmueller’s home, I highly recommend reading the accompanying article which captures Kipfmueller’s wit, historic references and details his highly personal solutions to his home decor. For example, I learned (but was actually not surprised) that the rich tones on his living room walls were achieved with several coats of tinted butchers wax!

Posted by Marla Dekker July 1, 2014 / No Comments Filed Under Faux Bois, In the News, Jean Michel Frank, Karl Kipfmueller, townhouse.bz Art

Townhouse.bz presents an exclusive collection of Jud Nelson sculptures and prints, from 1977 to today.

What started it all? Muskrats. They burrowed into an abstract Styrofoam sculpture that Nelson had installed along the edge of a Minneapolis lake. When the chagrined Nelson retrieved the pieces from his irate patron, it was a revelation to see how beautifully the muskrats had carved the Styrofoam to create their burrows. Thus began Nelson’s exploration into hyper-realist sculpture with Styrofoam.

Jud Nelson’s sculpture, Holos/Series 5, No 6 (Tea Bag) is among his earliest hyper-realist sculptures. Carved completely from Styrofoam, including the staple and the string, it is the 6th tea bag of the Holos/Series of tea bags in 1977. (pictured below)

Nelson developed his sculpture series of multiples of everyday objects with minute differences as a lesson in seeing to quote John Russell of the New York Times. Nelson challenges the viewer to examine everyday objects. His cool, minimalist presentation, exquisite attention to detail, and deadpan humor has art critics simultaneously comparing Nelson to Chuck Close, Michelangelo and Sol Lewitt.

The Holos/Series 6 No 6 (Popsicle), 1978, (pictured top) is one of Nelson’s early marble sculptures and marks his switch from Styrofoam to marble as his preferred medium. Nelson realized that marble offered him the granular control he needed to render the finest details. The Popsicle is carved from the same block of Carrara marble statuario as his icnonic sculpture, Hefty 2-Ply, commissioned by the Walker Art Center in 1979.

Nelson’s Still Life Study (Peanuts), 1983, represents the addition of stones of color to his body of work. The life-sized peanut shell is travertine marble and the peanuts are honey-colored marble, both found in rubble outside the San Marco Cathedral, Venice, Italy. Always resourceful in his use of materials, Nelson frequently repurposes discarded stones for his art.

The Block Buster Series (Bear), 1980, is from Nelson’s later exploration of colossal blow-ups of animal crackers. Conceived as a project for the UN’s Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza with Linda Macklowe, the curator of the sculpture garden, a number of animal crackers were sculpted as maquettes for full-size sand-cast bronzes.



Limited Edition, Signed Prints
In addition to Nelson’s sculptures, townhouse.bz and Nelson have collaborated to offer Portrait of Wonder Bread 1, 2 and 3. Limited edition prints of photographs of Nelson’s Carrara statuario marble sculptures HOLOS/Series 7, 1977. Coolly elegant and minimalist with deep, matte blacks and greys on premium, matte paper, the prints feature the breathtaking detail of Nelson’s sculptures. The Portrait of Wonder Bread series is a juxtaposition of the dispassionate study of bread with the imprint of the artist’s hand on each piece of bread.

Never simply Super Realistic, his work always questions the reality of physical existence, and appeals to some alienated modern sense of the existentially absurd… Kim Levin, Arts Magazine, October 1981

Click here to see more of Jud Nelson’s work.
Contact townhouse.bz with inquiries about Jud Nelson’s artwork.

Do we have Georges Braque to thank for design’s ongoing love affair with faux bois? Take a look at his 1912 seminal papier-collé Fruit Dish and Glass (Compotier et Verre), which was recently gifted to the Metropolitan Museum of Art by famed art collector Ronald Lauder. When Braque decided to paste pieces of mechanically printed faux bois wallpaper on to his still-life drawing, he elevated a traditional decorative trope to the level of fine art and revolutionized art making.

Once faux bois entered the modernist lexicon, it became an essential design element in textiles, garden furniture, ceramics, and more. The best of these efforts merge wood-grain patterning with the wit and intelligence of twentieth-century art. In Townhouse.bz’s collection, there are several fine examples of Grandjean-Jourdan’s faux bois tableware. This father and son team of post-WWII regional artists created their hand-painted pottery in the famed town of Vallauris—the same area where Braque’s friend and sometimes rival Pablo Picasso produced his own prodigious output of painted ceramics. Clearly, Grandjean-Jourdan drew inspiration from the biomorphic explorations of Jean Arp and Constantin Brâncuși.

These side tables attributed to the legendary San Francisco designer John Dickinson verge into the realm of surrealism. The tables are actually made of wood that has been carved in a stylized manner to imitate the imitators! A visual double entendre that we think George Braque and his contemporaries would have loved.

Posted by Marla Dekker June 6, 2013 / No Comments Filed Under Classical Modernism, Faux Bois, In the News, Modernism, What Is...

Townhouse is designed, written and produced by Dekker Babian. Townhouse is located in Brooklyn, NY. All text and photos © 2019.